Homeschooling – Advantages and Disadvantages

Homeschooling has been growing popular nowadays. It offers the convenience of having good quality education right in the comforts of your own home. Many parents found it as the perfect answer to educating their children. They are able to focus on their child’s education and provide support for them. It has also been recognized by many educational institutions, college universities and various job-offering companies.

Do you want to know if homeschooling is the right one for your child? Before deciding, it is important to know its advantages and disadvantages in order to have a clearer view of its two different perspectives. The following are the advantages to be considered:

1. If your child is physically incapable of going outside due to complicated diseases or is handicapped, having home education would be convenient both for the child and the parent.

2. Home education is associated with close-knit family relationship as the child only interacts with the other family members.

3. The child is also expected to be well-behaved if educated at home as he is not exposed to various immoralities that may come to influence him/her in a real school.

4. Some parents believe that school is not a safe place for their child. Some also believe that the school is not educationally competent; a lot of concepts are not completely taught in there. In home education, they are secured with the kind of education provided to their child and they can be able to guide their child the whole time.

5. In home learning, the parents could also control the curriculum of the education provided to their child. They can concentrate their child’s learning on a specific topic if they want to.

6. Expenses are cut-off in home education. Children don’t need to spend on transportation fees, expensive projects and unnecessary school supplies.

On the other hand, the following are the disadvantages:

1. The home educated child would not develop social skills as he is not exposed to other types of people.

2. Freedom is abstained from the child; the child would not enjoy his life as a child. There are many other things that cannot be learned in an educational setting and these are only learned through experience.

3. Some people do not believe on home education’s academic quality as it does not follow the standard curriculum.

4. In some college universities, they require additional tests for home educated children. This is to ensure that the child is academically ready for college.

5. Those who are educated at home for a long time and have decided to go to school are found to be lacking in social skills.

6. Home educated individuals commonly experience psychological problems when exposed to the social environment as in entering a college/university or working on a job.

As you look at homeschooling in two different points of view, think hard before deciding whether to go for it or not. Be careful in making a decision as a parent would only want the best for their young ones. After all, education is the most important privilege that a parent could give to their child.

Homeschooling High School – The Importance of Junior Year

Junior year is one critical moment in time when you are homeschooling high school. In freshman and sophomore year you can kind of “fly by the seat of your pants”, but in junior year there are certain tasks that you need to do. On the first day of senior year you really want your child to start to apply for colleges. This sounds easy enough and only applies to senior year except for one minor detail. If you don’t know where you’re going to apply on the first day of senior year, it’s kind of hard to actually do the applying.

That is why much of junior year is spent figuring out what colleges your student is going to apply to. You do that by making sure that your child takes the PSAT, and the SAT or ACT. These tests will tell them the approximate test score that they have so that they will know which college they will fit with. You can also go to a college fair so you can get an overview of colleges you may want to attend.

Another important task of junior year is to identify a school that you want to visit and then actually visit the college. Otherwise, you may discover it is not anything like the name that they have on the side of their buildings or what you see in their marketing brochures. You have to make sure that the college is a good fit for your child.

When you are homeschooling high school, pay attention to the college search during junior year and then you can be really successful.

Homeschooling Methods: From Charlotte Mason to Classical Education

Homeschooling? Unschooling? Charlotte Mason? Waldorf? Part-time? Full-time? The variations within homeschooling can be overwhelming. But don’t worry — it’s not as scary as it first seems.

Consider these common curriculums and educational philosophies used by homeschoolers. This is by no means a comprehensive list, but does cover many major programs and should help you feel more comfortable deciding what kind of homeschooler you are.

Unit Studies

In unit studies, one subject is intensely focused on at a time. This can teach the ability to both compartmentalize and synthesize information. Examples are doing an in-depth study of the presidents of the United States, or spending the month before a vacation to the ocean studying the sea and weather patterns. Unit studies can also use a child’s interests to study a broader subject; for example, studying fashion trends through the ages in order to see how major events in history affected day-to-day living.

Charlotte Mason

The Charlotte Mason method is based on the work of British educator Charlotte Mason. She believed that “education is an atmosphere, a discipline, and a life.” She believed that atmosphere makes up one-third of a child’s education, that cultivating good habits makes up another third, and that children should be taught living, practical ideas rather than dry facts.

Waldorf

Waldorf education aims to educate the whole child, “head, heart, and hands.” Waldorf tries to encourage a genuine love of learning in each child and incorporates arts and activities to create students who are able to create meaning in their lives without external help.

Montessori

The Montessori method focuses on student-directed learning that aims to support a child’s natural way of learning. Montessori involves one-on-one attention and teacher observation and emphasizes all five senses rather than just the visual and auditory senses used in reading, listening, and watching.

Multiple Intelligences

Multiple intelligences education is based on Dr. Howard Gardner’s eight areas of intelligence and learning styles: linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalist. Each individual has strengths in one or more of these intelligences, and the multiple intelligences method involves discovering those strong areas and teaching through them (for example, a student strong in bodily-kinesthetic, or touch-related, knowledge will be most likely to learn by doing, whereas a linguistically-strong child will learn best through reading, writing, and playing with words).

Classical Education

Classical education utilizes three age groups or learning periods, called the “grammar period” (which focuses on the building blocks of education, memorization, and and rules of basic math, phonetics, etc.), the “logic stage” (when cause-and-effect relationships are explored and the child is challenged to ask “Why,” engage in critical thinking, and synthesize ideas), and the “rhetoric stage” (when the student learns to use language to clearly and powerful explain his/her ideas, and begins to focus on areas of knowledge that draw his/her interest; this stage can sometimes involve internships, apprenticeships, college courses, and other forms of higher/specialized education).

Thomas Jefferson Education

Thomas Jefferson Education, also known as “Leadership Education,” also follows three periods: the “foundational phases” (which focus on core values and love of learning), “educational phases” (which teach study skills and discipline; at this stage students engage in a mentor-guided program such as an internship or setting and reaching a personal goal), and “applicational phases” that exist after formal schooling and last the rest of the student’s life (during which the student focuses on contribution to community, and acts as a mentor or community leader). Thomas Jefferson education focuses heavily on love of learning, commitment to values, and seven keys to great teaching.

Accredited Curriculum/Long-Distance/Internet Schooling

This type of homeschool, sometimes referred to as “public school at home” is highly structured and uses state-approved curricula that mirror the curricula being used in public schools. The parent acts as teacher and there is usually a satellite teacher or mentor that the student reports to. Examples include K12.com, LUOnlineAcademy.com, and various university-affiliated high school programs such as Penn Foster High School and BYU Independent Study.

Delayed Schooling

This type of schooling follows the belief that children are not ready for formal schooling until the ages of 7-9. This approach encourages play and natural curiosity in the early years and moves toward more formal learning as the child reaches age 7 (with flexibility depending on the child). This philosophy, though sometimes challenged, is becoming commonly accepted even in some mainstream schools, particularly in the U.K., and is fairly common among unschoolers.

Principle Approach

The Principle Approach to education, which is based on the writing of Rosalie J. Slater and Verna M. Hall, looks at all subjects and information through a Christian worldview. The Bible is used as a major textbook and the student creates notebooks that incorporate both school material and his/her thoughts and meditations. The Principle Approach uses “the 4 Rs,” Research (finding God’s word and identifying religious principles), Reasoning (discovering cause and effect relationships), Relate (applying information to the student), and Record (writing down or otherwise recording the student’s applications and impressions).

Faith-Based

Similar to the Principle Approach but more flexible and not specific to any belief system, faith-based homeschooling incorporates both secular and religious knowledge, and religious beliefs and the family’s values are worked freely into learning and discussions. Though this intermingling is a natural side effect of being homeschooled in a religious household, faith-based education more obviously connects academic knowledge to religion. Spiritual beliefs and experiences are considered as or more important to the child’s education as secular knowledge, and the parent actively seeks to incorporate religious beliefs into the student’s curriculum/educational experience.

Learning Centers

Though not often used full-time as a replacement for public or private school, many homeschoolers find it useful to supplement their curricula with courses and/or tutoring at learning centers such as Kumon, Sylvan, and Huntington. These centers can be especially useful as a student approaches college, as many of them offer ACT and SAT prep courses.

As always, homeschooling is a deeply individual individual matter that should be altered to fit your family. As long as your homeschooling method works for you, keep it, love it, change it as needed, and enjoy the adventure.

Homeschooling High School: Finding the Best Curriculum

One very common question among homeschoolers is “where do I find the best curriculum?”

There is not one curriculum that’s the best. There is only the curriculum that’s the best fit for your child. This is why I don’t think anybody can tell you what the best curriculum is, because it may not fit your child at all. So, one of the things you want to be thinking about is what has worked for your in the past because that’s the kind of thing that’s likely to be a successful curriculum in the future.

The other thing you want to be thinking about, especially during the high school years, is whether the curriculum was made for homeschoolers. The reason this is important is because there’s a lot of curriculum out there, even sold at homeschool conventions, that was originally developed for public and private high school teachers. These books assume that you are in a classroom setting and includes lots of repetition. It also assumes that the teacher knows the subject. This means if you were to buy a French book that was intended for a public school French teacher, it would assume you know French.

In contrast, if you buy curriculum that is intended and written for homeschoolers, it’s going to assume that you know nothing. It will assume that you don’t know the subject and that your child doesn’t know the subject. This is how you get through, especially those difficult subjects like chemistry, physics or algebra. You will want to choose a curriculum that is made for homeschoolers and this will help you be much more successful.

I have a suggestion for you if are looking for curriculum for the very first time and you have no idea where you are going to start or what you are going to do. Usually, I point people to Sonlight curriculum because I find that it has the best hand-holding and can help you kind of ease in to a homeschool curriculum a little bit. So, if you are completely flummoxed and you don’t have a clue where to start, look at Sonlight curriculum. Other than that just make sure that your curriculum choices are made for homeschoolers.

Are You Aware Of These Benefits Of Homeschooling?

Did you know that there are benefits of homeschooling your child as compared to sending him or her to a public school? In this article I will be sharing with you three pros of teaching your child from home.

Benefits Of Homeschooling #1 – Your Child Gets To Spend Time With You

When your child is young, it is really important that you develop a close relationship with him or her. This will definitely go a long way, especially when your child is older. If you are your child’s teacher, obviously you will get the chance to spend quality time with him or her. I am sure you would love to see your child grow and learn. This is one opportunity that you do not get if you send your child to a public school. When your child gets the chance to spend time with you, the bond between the two of you will strengthen, and in the later years, that will pay dividends.

Benefits Of Homeschooling #2 – Your Child Is Safe From Bad Influences And Bullying

The next real advantage of teaching your child from home is that your child is not exposed to bad influences and bullies that may be present in public schools. You do not want your child to live a wayward lifestyle as a result of bad company. Neither do you want your child to end up becoming a victim of bullying, which cannot always be controlled in schools outside. When your child learns from home, your child is guaranteed a safe environment, because the environment will most likely be your home.

Benefits Of Homeschooling #3 – Your Child Learns Better

Research has shown that children who get their education from home grow up to be more successful in life than those who went to public school. Well if you think about this, this is quite true, because public schools tend to have a rigid education system, whereas homeschool education systems tend to be more flexible. What do I mean by the latter? Well, a homeschool education system is meant to suit the child’s preferred style of learning. Not only that, but this system also capitalizes on daily life events to teach a child new concepts. For example, a day in the kitchen can be an opportunity to teach the child about weight measurements and volume measurements.

I hope you have learnt something new about the benefits of homeschooling. I hope you will take some time to reflect on what I have mentioned here too.