How To Get The Most From A Home Tutoring Program For Your Child

Getting a home tutor for your child can be one of the best things that you can do, especially if there are specific areas that your child seems to be having problems with. The choices you make and how you go about hiring the private tutoring services can, however determine how helpful the whole arrangement turns out to be for your child. As a parent, you want to get top quality with the teaching and this means you ought to pay attention to tutoring elements that matter most.

1. Choose the tutor with caution

The first thing you should do is at least have expectations of the tutor so you are able to qualify the best candidate for your child. Some of the things that you should think about when selecting the tutor for your child are specialization, experience, location, available schedule and the tuition rate. If there is a specific subject that you want handled by the tutor then one specialized in that same subject is best and you also want to think how easy it will be for the tutor to commute to your home for the classes.

2. Decide on tuition subjects and sessions

How long will the class sessions last and what subjects will be tackled is the question that you need to ask yourself here. If you are getting a tutor for a younger child, remember that the attention span for them is shorter compared to older children. Ideally, each session should last anywhere between an hour or two, depending on the age and educational stage of the child. Each session should also only tackle not more than 2 subjects otherwise you will not get anything much from the home lessons.

3. Communicate expectations with the tutor

This is very important to do so that you both are on the same page from the word go. One of the best things you can do for your child is to let the tutor know about their character so they are best prepared to handle the sessions in the best way possible to avoid wastage of valuable time. For instance restless kids may be better handled with interesting lessons whereas playful one will need a strict hand to manage. Be reasonable with your expectations; the tutor may not manage to move your child to grade A in just a few home lessons.

4. Monitor the tutoring materials, lessons and even homework

You want to be sure that the home education is quality enough by checking the materials the tutor is using with your child. A good parent will also take interest in homework given to the child; homework is very important because of how short the sessions are making it hard for everything to be covered. If need be, sit in one or two of the lessons and assess how comfortable you are with the teaching offered by the tutor.

5. Get feedback from your child

Do they feel the lessons are beneficial or not? Feedback especially from older children can help you know whether the home tutoring is adding any value or not so you can make helpful decision with regards to the same.

Ten Great Reasons to Homeschool Your Child

1. You will be the number one influence on your child and his formation, instead of learning the latest “dirty word” or being encouraged to have a girlfriend at the very mature age of 10.

2. It will allow you the chance to get to know your child better because you will be with him most of the day. An average child will spend about 11,000 hours in the classroom. That doesn’t even include activities and time away with friends. Children are young for such a short period of time. Why miss that much time with them?

3. You can allow your child to learn at her own pace, whether she is ahead or behind. Teaching in a traditional school is “one-size-fits-all.” Differences in things such as learning styles and the child’s temperament will not be taken into consideration. If your child has difficulty keeping up in math class, she may get lumped together with children in the “special ed” room, instead of being allowed to go back a level and relearn some things.

4. The ability to teach your religious faith and pray during your school day. This is very important. It is a proven fact that many children will lose their faith when faced with the day in an day out assault on their beliefs. Christian teenagers, in interviews, often report that they fell like a tiny, beleaguered minority at school. They often feel alone in their struggles to live by the Christian values of avoiding premarital sex, risqué music and videos, pornography, alcohol and drugs. Why throw your lambs to the wolves at such an early age. Keep them at home for as long as possible to help build a solid foundation for weathering future storms. Which brings me to #5 ….

5. The ability to have a say in who your child’s friends are. If you homeschool for any amount of time, you will seek out and find like-minded families and friends. I cannot say enough about how this has helped one of my more rebellious children in his ability to mature and grow through his teen years. His homeschooling friends are all being raised with roughly the same types of values so there is no “But Mom, everyone else is watching it, doing it , etc.” Also, there is a “positive peer pressure” from these friends. If my son started talking about drugs or bragging about viewing porn, these friends would not approve and it would not be considered cool.

6. Nicer, more pleasant children. I hate to say it, but it is true. I have strangers tell me all of the time how “well behaved” my children are. It is not that I am such a great mother or am constantly nagging them about their manners (though I do believe in teaching them), but it is because of the removal of what I call the “Lord of the Flies influence.” When children of the same age spend 6-7 hours a day together, five days a week for nine months of the year, unless they have adults constantly monitoring and correcting them, their behaviour can be somewhat barbaric and out-of-control.

7. No worries about bullies. Children often don’t say what all goes on at the classroom. The thought of a bully being mean to my little guy or stealing his glasses, makes my blood boil. Why put your kids through that, especially when they are young?

8. No worries about sexual abuse. A lot of attention has been given to sexual abuse by Catholic priests; however, the sexual abuse problem in the public school system gets little attention and is a serious and troubling problem. Here is an article on the AP report

9. More freedom to express creativity and be themselves. Some schools do encourage the arts more than others and consider spending of funds on the humanities worthwhile. My now 19-year-old son is an incredibly gifted artist and photographer. Being homeschooled, he had the freedom to pursue these natural talents of his unrestrained. When he was younger, he had an affinity for drawing monsters and weapons (mostly medieval). I know for sure that his drawings of weapons would not be allowed or appreciated in a traditional school.

10. The ability to embark on a learning adventure with your children. Who knew that learning could be so much fun? I used to hate history because it was so boring. I can remember falling asleep during American History class in highschool more than once! It wasn’t until I started homeschooling my children that I became enthralled with history. What a fascinating subject!

Now don’t get me wrong, there will be frustrating days and days that both you and the kids don’t feel like “doing school” at all; however, you will have many fun and interesting learning adventures together. Imagine snuggling together on the couch every morning together, so that you can read aloud to your children, instead of hustling them off onto a bus every morning. Picture spending a beautiful fall afternoon going on a nature walk with notebooks in hand for some observation.

Homeschooling your child will be work and take effort, but the rewards and special memories that you gain are greater than you can imagine and will last a lifetime.

Homeschooling and Gardening – What Your Child Can Learn and Grow in a Garden

The experience of growing a garden can help home school students learn a great deal. A garden can be very rewarding and also very frustrating. Growing a successful garden doesn’t have to be difficult. Here are some things that your home school student can learn from working on a garden:

1. Practical demonstration of how plants grow – You can read all you want about plant cycles in a textbook, but until you see it happen before your eyes, it doesn’t always make sense. Maintaining a garden shows children how a seed grows into a plant and how weeds grow right along with plants. They see a demonstration of how weeds can choke out a plant if they are not properly cared for.

2. Problem solving skills – When your plant doesn’t grow or you see holes or bugs all over your plants, you need to figure out what to do. This might cause motivation for further research on how to take care of the problem.

3. Growing plants can take some patience and perseverance – Sometimes it’s hard to wait for that seed to pop out of the ground or for the fruit to appear on their plant. Sometimes those pesky weeds keep coming up and need to be pulled and pulled again. Sometimes you need to keep tending to the plant that gets bugs or diseased. Regular maintenance of weeds is required to have a successful garden.

4. Gardening can be good therapy – After working hard and maintaining a garden it can be a wonderful experience to just go out in your garden and walk around to look at the plants and the wonders of God’s creation.

5. Multiple grades can benefit – A two year old and a 100 year old person can learn from and enjoy a garden. A small child can help plant and cover seeds over with dirt along with picking a few weeds. An older child can pick quite a few more weeds and learn about how the flower turns into the harvest. All ages can help with harvesting and processing the food that was harvested.

Even children living in a city can benefit from gardening. All you need is some dirt, a seed, water and sunlight. Try some easy plants first like: carrots, zucchini, tomatoes, beans, lettuce, and many more. Sometimes maintaining a garden can teach your child much more than they would ever learn from a book. There are many benefits for both parent and student.

Can You Homeschool Your Child and Still Work Full Time?

In today society the majority of families are dual income earners. Someone that wants to switch their children from public school or home school may shy away from the idea simply because they currently work at full-time job.

Although it may be a difficult task it is certainly one that can be accomplished with some creative planning. You would first want to consider the amount of time that most children are actually home school during the week. The typical home school schedule is much different from the traditional public school schedule which is generally around eight hours per day Monday through Friday. Most home school programs can be accomplished with just a few hours each day.

Next you will want to consider the individual student. Are they old enough to stay home by themselves while you’re working during the day? Can the student be given a lesson plan for the day and be expected to have this work completed for you to review when you return home? Does your child work well independently? If the answers are yes and then this will be an easy decision for you. If your child is not of an age where they can be left home alone then you will have to be a little more creative.

Since your average student does not follow the traditional 8 AM to 4 PM school schedule, you may find that home schooling early in the morning or late in the evening would work best for your family. You may also consider doubling up your work on your days off or over the weekend. It is not uncommon for students to be homeschooled on Saturdays and Sundays. Remember that you are in charge of the individual schedule and it can be made into anything that best suits your family.

There are many online curriculums that are available for you to choose from that allow you to work at your own pace not following a set schedule. This not only allows your child the educational freedom to work at their level but also provide you with the ability to educate your child at a time that works best for you. Another option would be a library-based curriculum. There are lots of free resources online that can be utilized for this type of curriculum. Although this choice would require a little more planning and effort from you it still would allow you to set your schedule to what works best for you and your student.

The decision to home school is often compared to a giant leap of faith. Trust yourself and your instincts to know what is best for your child’s education. Homeschooling while working a full-time job can be difficult at times but it can definitely be a rewarding accomplishment.

Want Your Child to Be Smarter at Math?

Who doesn’t want their child to be smarter at math? Who wouldn’t like to see an A on the report card, rather than that one legged version called an F?

Interestingly, it is REALLY simple to make this happen.

Before I tell you how to make this work, however, before I tell you the one step method for making your child’s math grades shoot up to an A, let me tell you the secret: you have to get your child to appreciate math as a game.

Hey, they can play video games like a world class champ! And they can program your smart phone like it is an abacus! And the difference is that they want to. And by getting them to play with numbers in a games fashion, they will want, and they will excel, and their grades will go up.

To begin with, I taught school for a number of years. First as a teacher, then owning my own private school. I used the method I am about to tell you with great success, and I got the kids to use this method during ‘play time.’ That’s right. Instead of them going out and actually playing, I got them to do math and ‘think’ (he he) they were playing.

Now, the biggest lack in math schooling, in my humble opinion, is the lack of basics. This is the times table, the addition table, the basics of how to manipulate numbers.

When I was in school (had to walk 20 miles, uphill both ways, through the driving snow) we had to do a page of tables every single day. Rain or shine, all the way through grade school, we did basic math.

Nowadays they don’t. They give a few pages in a book and think it is sufficient. It’s not. And for the simple reason that it doesn’t make math intuitive. It remains, even through high school, something they have to think about. Think. Long and hard and laborious. Any wonder why they don’t do well? The basics are TOTALLY out.

So, a page from the Case family larnin’ book. Cards.

Yep. Mama Case brought out a few decks of cards and we played. We learned how to play solitaire, and in group fashion. To this day I feel a profound happiness swell when I remember four of us, my brother, myself, my mother, and even granny! slapping those cards down, trying to beat one another, and laughing hysterically. Or crying foul when we was beat!

But the point is that we learned to look at numerical symbols and understand them. The speed at which we could differentiate a 4 from a 6, or a 9, or whatever, enabled us to win the game. So we wanted.

And, when the group wasn’t spending a night slapping cards down, we learned other games. Several forms of individual solitaire. Hearts, Rummy, whatever!

And here was an interesting bonus: when we played monopoly with the kids in the neighborhood, we became adept at reading the dice, at adding those cubes littered with one of six digits face side up!

What, you think it won’t work? HA! That’s like saying your child is immune to games. But if there really is a lack of enthusiasm, take another page from Mama Case’s book.

‘Oh, you don’t want to play? Shucks, I was going to bet a cookie. But that’s okay. I’ll eat that cookie myself, and you can watch those delicious crumbs dribble down my shirt front.’

Guaranteed. Those kids of yours are going to be making math a game, they will become adept at manipulating numbers, and when it comes time to learn a new math concept they are going to be LIGHT YEARS ahead of the curve.