The Effects of Homeschooling on Socialization

Why the debate about homeschooling and socialization?

A common criticism of homeschooling is that homeschool children will not be properly socialized and therefore will lack social skills. So what is it about school that is so important for socialization? As kids develop psychologically they go though many stages. The stages vary depending on the psychologist you happen to be reading, but there is a basic pattern. Kids are attached to their parents, then kids like to play around other kids (but not with them), then kids desire to make friends and play with the other kids (this is a simplified version of course). So the concern with homeschooling is that with homeschooled children not leaving to go to school when they are five they will not have the opportunity to go through proper psychological development because they will not have the other children of similar age to interact with. This of course means critics are assuming that homeschoolers lock their children in a room or chain them to a table making them do countless hours of school work and never letting them “socialize” with other children. In reality, because of concern for the social development of their homeshooled children many parents overcompensate involving their children in many group activities, even more than their public school peers.

What is the effect of public school on socialization?

Take a walk through a public school and listen to the conversations that kids are having, or check out one of the millions of Facebook pages of today’s students and you will most likely find yourself weeping for the future of mankind. There are epidemics of drug and alcohol abuse, sexual pressure, bullying, and a culture that celebrates ignorance over intelligence and creativity. The public schools promote an environment that overemphasizes the importance of athletic achievement and downplays academic or creative endevours. Football and basketball players have rallies that celebrate their achievement whether or not they have a winning season, while exemplary performers in academics, music and art are lucky to receive a letter home acknowledging their accomplishments. When a student puts forth a good effort in class the common ridicule is to be labeled a “try hard”. Can you think something any more ignorant to demean someone for. Trying hard is now somehow something to be ashamed of. This is the “Jersey Shore” Generation, a mindset that if you party, get drunk and make yourself sound as stupid as possible you can be rich and famous, trying hard and working for something is for chumps. That is the socialization that is taking place in public schools today.

Socialization is a pro for homeschooling not a con.

Homeschooling and socialization go hand in hand and give parents more say in their child’s psychological development. What is wrong with choosing who your child associates with when they are young? As a homeschool family you can join groups, go on playdates and of course your child can play kids in your neighborhood (after the public school kids finish their homework!). Educating you children at home does not mean they wont ever get to see other kids. They will probably get to interact even more. If I recall, most of the time kids got in trouble in my classes, it was for socializing! Additionally socialization is public schools is not diverse. In a typical class you have 30 children all of the same age and socioeconomic background. These groupings delay maturity because the young student have no older students to emulate. Homeschooled children interact with a much wider variety of people with diverse background and participate more within the community, you know the “real world”. Public schools claim to be preparing students for the real world yet foster an environment that is nothing like it, where being bad at a sport is more important than being good at math or science. The socialization debate is one that s long overdue to be turn on its head. Public schools should be asking “how can socialize our students in the way that homeschooled children are?”

Ten Great Reasons to Homeschool Your Child

1. You will be the number one influence on your child and his formation, instead of learning the latest “dirty word” or being encouraged to have a girlfriend at the very mature age of 10.

2. It will allow you the chance to get to know your child better because you will be with him most of the day. An average child will spend about 11,000 hours in the classroom. That doesn’t even include activities and time away with friends. Children are young for such a short period of time. Why miss that much time with them?

3. You can allow your child to learn at her own pace, whether she is ahead or behind. Teaching in a traditional school is “one-size-fits-all.” Differences in things such as learning styles and the child’s temperament will not be taken into consideration. If your child has difficulty keeping up in math class, she may get lumped together with children in the “special ed” room, instead of being allowed to go back a level and relearn some things.

4. The ability to teach your religious faith and pray during your school day. This is very important. It is a proven fact that many children will lose their faith when faced with the day in an day out assault on their beliefs. Christian teenagers, in interviews, often report that they fell like a tiny, beleaguered minority at school. They often feel alone in their struggles to live by the Christian values of avoiding premarital sex, risqué music and videos, pornography, alcohol and drugs. Why throw your lambs to the wolves at such an early age. Keep them at home for as long as possible to help build a solid foundation for weathering future storms. Which brings me to #5 ….

5. The ability to have a say in who your child’s friends are. If you homeschool for any amount of time, you will seek out and find like-minded families and friends. I cannot say enough about how this has helped one of my more rebellious children in his ability to mature and grow through his teen years. His homeschooling friends are all being raised with roughly the same types of values so there is no “But Mom, everyone else is watching it, doing it , etc.” Also, there is a “positive peer pressure” from these friends. If my son started talking about drugs or bragging about viewing porn, these friends would not approve and it would not be considered cool.

6. Nicer, more pleasant children. I hate to say it, but it is true. I have strangers tell me all of the time how “well behaved” my children are. It is not that I am such a great mother or am constantly nagging them about their manners (though I do believe in teaching them), but it is because of the removal of what I call the “Lord of the Flies influence.” When children of the same age spend 6-7 hours a day together, five days a week for nine months of the year, unless they have adults constantly monitoring and correcting them, their behaviour can be somewhat barbaric and out-of-control.

7. No worries about bullies. Children often don’t say what all goes on at the classroom. The thought of a bully being mean to my little guy or stealing his glasses, makes my blood boil. Why put your kids through that, especially when they are young?

8. No worries about sexual abuse. A lot of attention has been given to sexual abuse by Catholic priests; however, the sexual abuse problem in the public school system gets little attention and is a serious and troubling problem. Here is an article on the AP report

9. More freedom to express creativity and be themselves. Some schools do encourage the arts more than others and consider spending of funds on the humanities worthwhile. My now 19-year-old son is an incredibly gifted artist and photographer. Being homeschooled, he had the freedom to pursue these natural talents of his unrestrained. When he was younger, he had an affinity for drawing monsters and weapons (mostly medieval). I know for sure that his drawings of weapons would not be allowed or appreciated in a traditional school.

10. The ability to embark on a learning adventure with your children. Who knew that learning could be so much fun? I used to hate history because it was so boring. I can remember falling asleep during American History class in highschool more than once! It wasn’t until I started homeschooling my children that I became enthralled with history. What a fascinating subject!

Now don’t get me wrong, there will be frustrating days and days that both you and the kids don’t feel like “doing school” at all; however, you will have many fun and interesting learning adventures together. Imagine snuggling together on the couch every morning together, so that you can read aloud to your children, instead of hustling them off onto a bus every morning. Picture spending a beautiful fall afternoon going on a nature walk with notebooks in hand for some observation.

Homeschooling your child will be work and take effort, but the rewards and special memories that you gain are greater than you can imagine and will last a lifetime.

How Can Homeschooling Potentially Affect Our Society’s Future?

Educational issues abound in conversations, newspapers, and the minds of parents. Does anyone like No Child Left Behind? How can we keep and attract quality teachers? How can we equalize educational opportunities for children, regardless of race, color, and creed? Why do many think the public education system is a failure? These serious issues helped me make a decision that is, perhaps, another major issue in education today.

I homeschool my children and have done so since they were born. With the exception of my daughter’s two-month experiment with the local grammar school because she wanted to “know what school’s like,” they haven’t spent any time in public schools. I homeschool my kids because of No Child Left Behind. My kids get to explore many topics in depth and they don’t have to worry about taking a lot of tests. I homeschool because, while there may be good teachers in the local school, how do I guarantee that my children will get that teacher? At home, they get me, and I am a known quantity. The myriad problems and issues of today’s educational system guided me into the homeschooling decision. These issues have guided and continue to guide other families into making the same decision.

More homeschooling families must have some meaning, and create other issues, for society. Perhaps, some of these issues are as follows.

The market for curricula should increase. Homeschooling families choose, or design, their own curricula. Do you want a religious based curriculum or not? Do you like unit studies? Do you want an online-based curriculum for your children, or do you want to stick to paper and pencil?

Fewer children will be problem teens. Yes, some people think all teens are problems, but if you’ve ever been around a number of homeschooled teens, you can easily change that mindset. These are kids that still actually talk to their parents. These are kids that do stuff for themselves, and their families, that has real value and meaning, so they don’t need to seek meaning as much elsewhere.

Status symbols will hold less value. The majority of homeschooled families don’t have significant quantities of disposable income, so their kids don’t get designer jeans. There’s also a tendency in homeschooled families to be environmental and shop at thrift stores. My kids, and the other kids I’ve seen, don’t seem to have a desire for status symbols as much as the kids in school have. For instance, my daughter thought silly bands (plastic, shaped wrist bands) were kind of cool, but she didn’t profess a desire for them. She didn’t save her allowance for them. None of her friends had them, so why would she need them?

Public schools will get less money. Schools get their funding based on the number of children enrolled in classes and attendance. If the percentage of homeschooled children increases significantly, schools will notice a difference in their monetary resources.

Fewer people will go to college. Homeschooled kids learn how to think for themselves. They learn, well, they learn how to learn. They learn how to teach themselves. Traditionally, you learn basics like reading, writing, and arithmetic in school and you go to college to learn how to think. Homeschooled kids are learning how to think for themselves at a younger age. As a result, a college education won’t be as necessary.

Homeschooling High School – How Much Math For College Admission?

Parents with home-schooled children struggling in math sometimes ask what minimum level of math is necessary for high school graduation and college admission. 

One parent asked me if Algebra I and Geometry was sufficient.  She wanted to know whether Consumer Math would be OK to take instead of Algebra II for the last year of high school.  Her daughter was interested in starting an online business and felt she needed a consumer math class.  Mom wondered how this would look to a college, especially when it seems like everyone else includes Algebra 2.

If your child wants to go to college, then Algebra 2 is very important.  It’s extremely helpful to take Algebra 2 before taking The SAT, to increase their score on that college admission test.  Algebra 1, Algebra 2 and Geometry are important to most colleges, although there are some colleges without a math requirement.

There will always be time to fit in other math classes, like consumer math, either before or after Algebra 2.  This may help your child feel more comfortable before moving on to the next level of math.

For a child interested in starting an online business, you may want to point toward a business degree, just to increase interest in college.  Try to encourage her interests in a home business so that you can encourage her to develop the talents she will need to run the business herself.  Even home businesses have a LOT of math (believe me, I know!) and it will help her to have a good understanding of math and communication skills that a business degree requires.

Is Homeschooling Beneficial to Students? Understanding Its Advantages

There are several ways to educate children. In a regular school setting, students are required to go to school in a specified time for several days a week. Students participate in class activities and discussions. Parents are given the choice to enroll their children in either a private or public school. Another way to educate children is through homeschooling.

Homeschooling, which is also known as home-based learning, is an educational method that is typically done at home by tutors or by parents. More and more parents prefer to homeschool their children instead of sending them to a regular school. Some of them prefer this method of education because they are not satisfied with the teaching methods and techniques used in schools. Other parents are concerned about the setting of the school and the safety it provides. Homeschooling is also being preferred by individuals who are living in rural areas where school transportation is not readily accessible.

Through homeschooling, students can have a one-on-one discussion with their tutors. They can freely ask them about certain aspects of the lesson that they do not understand without worrying about the reactions of their classmates. Since most homeschooling programs involve homeschool activities and sports including music, art, and karate, students are given the opportunity to socialize with other people while pursuing their interests.

Parents are also given the freedom to raise or teach their children in accordance with their beliefs and culture. They can also strengthen the bond that they have with their children. Homeschooling enables parents to know their children on a deeper level and identify their bad and good characteristics. Studies reveal that parental involvement in education increases the chance of children to excel in various aspects of academics.

Another benefit of homeschooling is the customized educational curriculum it provides. Tutors or parents can specially design a curriculum that suits the needs of the student. Customized education can help strengthen the weaknesses of the student and maximize their learning capabilities.

Since parents can monitor their children when being homeschooled, they can control the factors and issues that influence their children. Homeschooler are less likely to experience peer pressure, bullying, and other violence that are experienced in school. In terms of financial matters, homeschooling is more cost-efficient than attending a regular school. Homeschooling will prevent parents to incur additional cost for school transportation, snacks, and foods.

Compared with children who go to school everyday, homeschoolers tend to be more involved in the community. They have the chance to experience hands-on activities such as museum and library visits. These children also have the privilege to take a vacation while still studying.

Homeschooling is another way for parents to educate their children. It helps parents instill their own values, beliefs, and morals to their children. However, homeschooling is not applicable to all children. Parents need to be responsible enough to weigh the situation and determine which method is best for their children. Whatever their decision is, parents should make sure that they choose the one that best suit the emotional, academic, and social needs of their children.